Hello Flames,
Sorry this is almost a day late. Some local lightning knocked our internet out on Sunday night and it wasn't fully restored when I left for work this morning.

For week two, RicoChey challenged us to explore the choice between brilliance and ignorance or to find inspiration in the synopsis,

"For the ailing patient, intelligence is a miserable burden."


How brilliant were our writers? Judge for yourself.

Reading List:


Title: none
Author: hwango
Word Count: 637
Warnings: nope.

Title: The Burden of Intelligence
Author: Shane Bell
Word Count: 2130
Warnings: Drug use.

Vote Here
 The first leap is always the farthest. Join us on Word Press to discuss showing off your work for the first time.
Before we start, let me quote some essential details from my introductory post from Week One, outlining the basics of this month's themed contest. To skip this, scroll directly to the prompt, located midway through this post!

Throughout this contest (and any time, truly), you can reach me fairly instantly by two reliable methods: 1. You can send me a Facebook message, or 2. You can pop an e-mail over to write.brain.dependent@gmail.com – either outreach pings my phone in real time, and I can respond accordingly.



Remember, the open door policy at the Flame isn't just for show -- reach out! The Mod Hydra is here to help, and to ensure that your experience is positive and constructive.

Welcome to Week Two of the theme, "Can you elaborate?" I understand there may have been some confusion about prompt limitations last week, so I've quoted the 'Basic Premise' portion below with a few choice edits in hopes that there will be no further miscommunication. I do not believe in limiting the creative mind unfairly or unnecessarily, so let's nip that in the bud!:

Basic Premise: You are presented with an example of a synopsis for an episode of a television series (there is so necessity to have seen, or to be familiar with, either the episode or the show). Using this synopsis, write your entry. You may also use the title of the episode or something you know about the series or episode quoted to inspire your entry. You do not have to use the name of the character mentioned in the synopsis. These parts of each month’s prompt are interchangeable at the entrant’s discretion; however, you may like to make a clear statement in an Author’s Note about the origin of your inspiration if you deviate unexpectedly from the episode title and/or synopsis provided as each month’s prompt. All forms of writing are welcome!



Again, if anyone has any questions, the Hydra's three silly heads are here to make sure everyone has a good time. Now, without further ado, the prompt for Week Two!

House, M.D. [S6E8]: ‘Ignorance is Bliss’ –“For the ailing patient, intelligence is a miserable burden.”


I've heard people say Hemingway was crushed by the weight of his own genius. Obviously I'm not claiming to understand what that must be like, but I feel as though I have come close to being able to imagine it every so often. In a world where one mustn't look far to find ignorance, for those of us who have worked hard to be enlightened and educated it can feel like suffocation to caught suddenly in the company of those who either have not come as far, or who choose never to try. Ignorance can feel as heavy as humidity in the presence of the wrong kinds of people, even when it isn't their intention to cause you that kind of discomfort.


In the quoted episode of House, the doctor treats a patient whose intelligence is a celebrated gift, but for whom the gift has become a terrible burden. When we meet the patient, he has deliberately chosen a lifestyle much simpler and less demanding than what he knew before, and has abandoned any pursuits that require the use of his brilliant mind. As the episode unfolds, we learn more about how he has willfully suppressed his mind, if only to feel less alone in a crowded room.


This week, how will you explore the maddening choice between brilliance and ignorance? Or the awful suffering of having to hide your thoughts and ideas, if only to continue to fit in with the people around you? Show us your take on the idea of a gift being a burden, or interpret the prompt in a brand new way, and show us something altogether unexpected. Write what you must!


Remember, to advance to main voting for Week Two, you must have survived Week One voting. If not, your entry (or entries) still qualifies for Just For Fun voting and is welcome in the poll! You can access the poll below. Entries are due Sunday, August 16th at 2345 Eastern Time. No sign-ups are necessary for this contest.






Submit Here

RicoChey had some technical difficulties logging in so I am posting this for her.
Good Monday to you, Flames.

This month, RicoChey is asking us to elaborate on some rather vague TV show & movie synopses she found online. It doesn't matter if you've ever seen the show or know anything about it, the point is to take the thought and run with it...while typing.

Week One prompt: "Rick Struggles To Cope."

Four of our writers were up to the challenge. Let's see what they came up with.
This month will be one of our standard contests. One winner for the month, but you can only compete if you write in all four weeks. Only one of these writers can win the month, but if you want to write with us in weeks two through four, you can submit an entry just for fun that will be shared with the community and voted on for likes not wins.

Your reading list awaits! Get in there and share some feedback with your fellow writers. We all appreciate the #commentlove. Use the comments of this post if you have trouble posting comments to the writer's blog or journal.

Title: none
Author: hwango
Word Count: 646
Warnings: I don't think so.

Title: How To Cope: Chop Until The Screaming Stops
Author: Kathy Boles-Turner
Word Count: 495
Warnings: TWD Spoilers AHOY!

Title: Insomnia
Author: Kristina Van Hoose
Word Count: 1226
Warnings: Characters have sex, but it is not described

Title: Rick Copes
Author: Shane Bell
Word Count: 900
Warnings: Sex, violence, language

[polldaddy poll="9019094"]
 Welcome to Week One of the August contest for 2015!

To view full details, click here to redirect to Word Press! This month we'll be turning vague previews into the big picture. 

Come play!
Good morning, Flames!
Our July contest is almost over. The only thing left to do is read our week four entries for "The beginnings of all things are small."

I hope you had fun writing with us this month. We truly enjoyed having you. Hopefully, you are already cooking up plots for RicoChey's first August challenge. (There was no sign-up so you can jump WRITE in.)

Be sure you invite your friends to read with us and write with us. The more contestants that turn out, the more opportunities for challenge we will have.

Remember to share feedback with your fellow writers. Being voted for is nice, but most of us also want to know how our writing appealed to another - be it our wordplay, our imagination, or choice in character. Talk to each other - share some #commentlove - this is a community to promote growth in creativity and craft.

Your reading list awaits.

Title: it starts small in all directions
Author: alethessa
Word Count: 109 or 211
Warnings: domestic violence implied in one direction of reading

Title: Lunch
Author: ayumidah
Word Count: 400
Warnings: none

Title: Prophesied
Author: Bibi Nafeeza Yusuf
Word Count: 400
Warnings: none

Title: From small beginnings
Author: bluegerl
Word Count: 317
Warnings: no warnings

Title: Germ
Author: Kathy Boles-Turner
Word Count: 336
Warnings: Experimental; Creative Nonfiction; A Judgment On Humankind

Title: The Text
Author: Kristina Van Hoose
Word Count: 399
Warnings: None

Title: The Camel
Author: Shane Bell
Word Count: 400
Warnings: Severe Language

Title: No. My Birthday.
Author: skyllairae
Word Count: 341
Warnings: emotional trigger: abuse

VOTE HERE
Week three set a challenge to our writers to weave us a bit of fancy using the prompt "Glitches" in 350 words or less. They have responded.

Congratulations to last week's winner Bibi. Who will sweep the voting this week? Help us decide. You have until 11:45 pm EDT on Thursday, July 30th to cast your vote. Be sure to leave a little feedback for our writers in the form of #commentlove.

Title: Trouble
Author: ayumidah
Word Count: 350
Warnings: none

Title: Emotionlessly Emotional
Author: Bibi Nafeeza Yusuf
Word Count: 350
Warnings: none, i think

Title: OOops
Author: bluegerl
Word Count: 350
Warnings: none

Title: He Was Foretold
Author: Kathy Boles-Turner
Word Count: 344
Warnings: Mention of death; witchery

Title: The Countdown
Author: Kristina Van Hoose
Word Count: 349
Warnings: none

Title: Glitches #1 - #3
Author: quill_quirks
Word Count: 350
Warnings: some sex

Title: The Chinabot
Author: Shane Bell
Word Count: 350
Warnings: Language!!

Title: Glitches
Author: Sonya Oldwin
Word Count: 344
Warnings: mature & murder

VOTE HERE





Marcus Tullius Cicero, one of Rome's greatest orators once said,

"The beginnings of all things are small."


Let this be the spark for your last submission in our Month-o-Minis - the seed for your beanstalk, the frenetic atom that sets a new universe in motion with a bang.

Our week four contest is for the prompt, "The beginnings of all things are small." Use it as inspiration for an idea or even your first sentence, the choice is yours. All entries should be no more than 400 words and are due by 11:45 pm EDT on Saturday, August 1st. Only one entry per person, no JFF entries accepted.

Thank you all for writing with us this month! We have enjoyed your writing and your feedback.
Registered writers for week four:
Shane Bell
quill-quirks
Kristina Van Hoose
B.Nafeeza
Heather
skyllairae
Sonya
Kathy Boles-Turner
ayumidah
bluegerl
hwango
alethessa

Good writing!

Just a reminder for those who are new to Brigit's Flame. Your entry should be posted to an online blog or journal with public reading access for the duration of the voting process (anywhere from three days to a week). Work you submit to the contest always belongs to you. It should be original work and first written for the prompt provided.

Submit Here





One last contest in our Month-o-Minis!
Sign up now to write with us for Week Four.



Your prompt will be posted on Sunday (7/26).

This contest will be limited to those who sign up to participate by Friday, July 24. Get your name in before midnight Eastern time.

Shane Bell and quill_quirks made a blanket sign-up for the whole month, so they are already counted on the list.

In addition to the verbal prompt you'll get this weekend, the week four contest will have a word cap of 400 and only one submission will be accepted per writer.

Put your name in below and look for the prompt on Sunday.

Be sure you are following us on facebook, twitter, tumblr, or wordpress so you don't miss a deadline.

 
Good morning, writers and readers of the Flame!
Last week's reading submissions were excellent. Thank you to all the writers who submitted and to everyone who joined in to read and give the writers feedback. Voter turnout was amazing! It resulted in a tie between Kristina Van Hoose and Shane Bell. Shane won the dance-off vote-off, but now we know there are those with the power to defeat him. Keep an eye on your six, Shane.

We have a new writer joining us this week. Everyone say hi to Bibi! And in case we missed it last week (because I was half asleep) let's extend a welcome to Sonya, Kristina Van Hoose, and Heather who wrote with us the first time on "Knothole". So glad to have you join us :)

Let's get down to it, shall we? The writing topic for the following entries was "Doll's Eyes" and our writers were limited to a max word count of 200. Everyone had the opportunity to submit two entries and there was no (timely) sign-up post so submissions were open to any and all.

Once you've read through the submissions, be sure to share some #commentlove. Just keep your feedback kind and constructive. If you have trouble commenting on anyone's post, you are welcome to leave your comment here and we will pass it on.
Vote for as many entries as you like, but keep in mind we can have only one winner.

Your reading list awaits:


Title: Stare
Author: ayumidah
Word Count: 200
Warnings: none

Title: A Lonely Pain
Author: Bibi Nafeeza Yusuf
Word Count: 194
Warnings: none

Title: Babies
Author: bluegerl
Word Count: 183
Warnings: hurt/pain'/madness

Title: Life?
Author: bluegerl
Word Count: 197
Warnings: none

Title: Doll's Eyes
Author: Heather
Word Count: 201
Warnings: Hints at child abuse

Title: The Eyes
Author: Kathy Boles-Turner
Word Count: 198
Warnings: creative nonfiction

Title: Doll's Eyes
Author: Kristina Van Hoose
Word Count: 192
Warnings: Not sure if it needs saying, but it discusses kidnapping

Title: Celestial Lullaby
Author: quil_quirks
Word Count: 17
Warnings: none

Title: The Doll's Eyes
Author: Shane Bell
Word Count: 200
Warnings: suggestive themes

Title: Doll's Lament
Author: skyllairae
Word Count: 133
Warnings: feelings of loss and abandonment

Title: Good Girl Days
Author: Sonya Oldwin
Word Count: 100
Warnings: mature

Title: Too Close To Home
Author: Sonya Oldwin
Word Count: 100
Warnings: implied mutilation

Vote Here
Since our word count is growing, I bring to the prompt this week things that start out small but can have a huge impact.

Glitches





As a writer, a glitch is a great device for change or chaos. It is neutral, yet mischievous. It causes aggravation, panic, economic disasters, or just a bit of distortion that laymen try to slap back into line with a firm hand.

Root out your glitch. Tell us what happened and submit it by 11:45 pm EDT on Saturday, July 25. The week three contest is limited to the list of Embers below. There is a max word count of 350 and only one submission will be accepted per writer. Poetry and other forms of written expression welcome. There are no JFF entries this month.

For those of you who are writing with us for the first time. Your entry should be posted to an online blog or journal with public reading access for the duration of the voting process (anywhere from three days to a week). Work you submit to the contest always belongs to you. It should be original work and first written for the prompt provided.

This week's contestants:
Shane Bell
quill_quirks
bluegerl
ayumidah
Kristina Van Hoose
Sonya
b.nafeeza
skyllairae
Kathy Boles-Turner
RicoChey

Submit Here
Hello readers,
I'm back on topic for the study of humor in stories from various genres. My goal in this series of articles is to prompt you to examine how and why the stories you read are funny. To analyze how the humor works so you can better incorporate levity in your own writing to a degree that suits your needs.

We started out with a high-level look at an author who wrote for the sole purpose of being humorous- Erma Bombeck. It was her job to make mundane observations of her commonplace life and turn them into something hilarious. Her humor appeals because there are relatable truths within the hilarity, even if you were not a housewife during the Seventies.

Our next author was Christiana Ellis. Her stories are also written solely to be funny, but instead of anecdotes based on real life Christiana chooses fantasy settings and characters. The tales she writes are madcap and playfully raucous.

Then we moved on to a writer who uses humor, but it is not his end goal. Jim Butcher writes fantasy fiction that balances levity and action in a way that can make you laugh out loud, but it is really just a distraction for a sucker punch that will have you flipping pages and praying that there's still a pulse.

The novel up for discussion today is similar in its use of humor. The Martian by Andy Weir is about an astronaut who gets left behind on Mars.

At its core, the story is some seriously hard science related in a fictional setting. The character of Mark Watney is a botanist and mechanical engineer. And of course, he's an astronaut whose space mission went about as wrong as it could go while leaving him alive.

The Martian is the ultimate survival story. Though, instead of foraging for nuts and grubs on a deserted island -- he's on Mars. He can't breathe the air, there is no flora or fauna, and no ships to signal with a really large bonfire.

There is also no rum.

He has to figure out how to survive with the stuff NASA sent to Mars for various missions. The writer, Andy Weir, is a scientist. All of the math, physics, chemistry, and botany factored into the story is real. All of the space program data is real.

Aside from an initial thought of, "Wow, how's this guy gonna survive?" you might be thinking it would be a dull read. But it's not.

Can you guess why?

Because it's funny. It's not a constant riot of laughter, but the interjection of humor at key points bonds the reader to the character and his plight. It cuts through the hard science and gives Mark Watney a facet of personality that anyone can relate to. And a reason to keep reading.

Mark's an upbeat guy. He's stranded on another planet and may end up starving to death, but he takes each problem in bite-size pieces and cusses around them like a good-natured sailor. Indeed, the story opens with the line: "I'm pretty much f**ked." Watney is a master of the f-bomb.

While working out how to scavenge parts and stretch his resources, he irreverently muses on the entertainment tastes of his former crew, making his own manure, and all of the various ways he will likely die on Mars. About 70% of the book is told from Watney's point of view via a series of log entries. Unfortunately, if I share too many of the funny quotes from the book with you, it could ruin the suspense, but here's one of my favorite laughs:
"I've fallen into a routine. Every morning I wake up at dawn. First thing I do is check oxygen and CO2 level. Then I have a protein bar, and one cup of water. I brush my teeth using as little water as possible and shave with an electric razor.
The rover has no toilet. We were expected to use our suits' reclamation systems for that, but they aren't designed to hold 20 days worth of output. My morning piss goes into a resealable plastic box. When I open it, the rover reeks like a truck stop men's room. I could take it outside and let boil off, but I worked hard to make that water. The last thing I'm going to do is waste it. I'll feed it to the water reclaimer in the Hab.
Even more precious is my manure. It's critical to the potato farm and I'm the only source on Mars. Fortunately, when you spend a lot of time in space, you learn how to s**t in a bag. And if you think things are bad after opening the piss box...imagine the smell after I drop anchor."

That snuck up on you, didn't it? Yes, it's gross, but it goes with the story. Survival ain't always pretty.

Overall, The Martian is a wonderful story and I plan to look for more books by Andy Weir. I recommend it to you as not just a thought provoking tale with roller-coaster spikes and drops, but also as a great example of how writing with humor can make a difference. Without it, this book might only have appealed to a small niche of science nerds, the levity allowed Mark Watney to shine and cross barriers into a more mainstream audience.

Because nothing beats a funny astronaut.

Talk funny to me.




 

Reminder time -
Voting ends today. Don't neglect your right to vote or cheat yourself out of a good read. Our writers did a fine job this month.

There is a sign-up post for the week three topic. Get your name in before the list is locked down, tomorrow.

Saturday night is your last chance to submit a story (or two) for week two. The topic is "Doll's Eyes" and any form of writing 200 words or less is welcome.

Add a desiccated digit to RicoChey's exquisite corpse. Read an installment of Kathy's interview with Gentle-wordsmith Robert Okaji. Check out the info skyllairae shared on getting published. (She knows this stuff, you should see her CV.) And stay tuned for another article tomorrow on Brigit's Flame.
This month is flying by!
I'm here to ask you to sign up to write for Week Three of the July Month-o-Minis.

Week Three! Can you believe it?
Of course, it doesn't technically start until you get your prompt on Sunday (7/19).

Since the sign-up post is here on a reasonable day, this contest will be limited to those who sign up to participate by Friday, July 17 (get your name in before midnight Eastern time).

Shane Bell and quill_quirks are already counted on the list.

In addition to the verbal prompt you'll get this weekend, the week three contest will have a word cap of 350 and only one submission will be accepted per writer.

Put your name in below. I'll see you Sunday.
Calling all readers!
The submissions are in for the flash fiction prompt:

"Knothole"


Be sure to set aside some time to read, comment, and vote. I hear drabble goes well with your morning coffee.
When sharing that comment love, please keep your feedback courteous and constructive. If you have difficulty commenting on a particular blog or journal, feel free to leave your comments addressed to the author on this post. The mods will make sure the writer is notified they have a comment here.

Your reading list awaits:


Title: Retrospect
Author: ayumidah
Word Count: 150
Warnings: none
ayumidah Retrospect

Title: School Problem
Author: bluegerl
Word Count: 150
Warnings: none
bluegerl School Problem

Title: Forever knotted
Author: bluegerl
Word Count: 149
Warnings: none
bluegerl Forever knotted

Title: Question.
Author: bluegerl
Word Count: 141
Warnings: none
bluegerl Question.

Title: Knothole
Author: Heather
Word Count: 155
Warnings: None
Heather Knothole

Title: Look Backwards Through The Fir Tree
Author: Kathy Boles-Turner
Word Count: 149
Warnings: Witchery. Two in one post, this is entry one.
Kathy Boles-Turner Look Backwards Through The Fir Tree

Title: The Radley Tree
Author: Kathy Boles-Turner
Word Count: 150
Warnings: Implies domestic abuse. Two in one post, this is entry two.
Kathy Boles-Turner The Radley Tree

Title: The Oak Tree
Author: Kristina Van Hoose
Word Count: 145
Warnings: none
Kristina Van Hoose The Oak Tree

Title: There"s Always A Tree Dying Somewhere
Author: quill_quirks
Word Count: 133
Warnings: There are no trigger warnings. Two in one post, this is entry one.
quill_quirks There"s Always A Tree Dying Somewhere

Title: Robotics
Author: quill_quirks
Word Count: 147
Warnings: There are no trigger warnings. Two in one post, this is entry two.
quill_quirks Robotics

Title: Knothole
Author: Shane Bell
Word Count: 150
Warnings: Mature
Shane Bell Knothole

Title: Tree Singing
Author: skyllairae
Word Count: 106
Warnings: experimental poetry
skyllairae Tree Singing

Title: Inside Looking Out
Author: Sonya Oldwin
Word Count: 100
Warnings: none
Sonya Oldwin Inside Looking Out

Title: A Bug's Life
Author: Sonya Oldwin
Word Count: 100
Warnings: none
Sonya Oldwin A Bug"s Life

Title: Through the Knothole
Author: Sonya Oldwin
Word Count: 100
Warnings: none
Sonya Oldwin Through the Knothole

Thank you to all of the writers who submitted. You don't know how happy it makes us to see your entries hitting the inbox. The poll will let you vote for as many entries as you like, but this contest will only have one winner.

I forgot to include a link to the poll :(
http://poll.fm/5ceok
The whole month of July we will be exploring small things to accommodate our tiny word count caps.
For week two your prompt is:

Doll's Eyes



I went through many dolls in my childhood. They sat on shelves, shared my pillow, and sometimes were forgotten on top of the toybox and left to stare at the ceiling all night. I had one that closed her eyes when you laid her down. She had surprisingly long eyelashes for a doll. Not soft like a person's, the eyelashes were one stiff curve of plastic jutting from a little blue eye. I used to press my finger to the curl - open, close, open, close. Eventually, one of the eyes stopped pivoting and she lived out the rest of her days in a permanent wink. With those very adult eyelashes it's no wonder she turned out cheeky.

In 200 words or less, tell us a tale from the doll's eye view and submit it by 11:45 pm edt on Saturday, July 18. I flubbed the sign-up so anyone may submit a maximum of two contest entries as long as the submissions do not rely on each other to tell one story and are not continuations of one another. Poetry and other forms of written expression welcome. There are no JFF entries this month.

For those of you who are writing with us for the first time. Your entry should be posted to an online blog or journal with public reading access for the duration of the voting process (anywhere from three days to a week). Work you submit to the contest always belongs to you. It should be original work and first written for the prompt provided.

Submit Here
.

About Us

brigitsflame: (Default)
Brigit's Flame - a writing community
RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Powered by Dreamwidth Studios

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags